Design and Manufacturing I Balltower Game Machine

For my Design and Manufacturing I class, each team designed and built a vehicle to compete in the Balltower Game. The goal of the game is get the highest score by collecting ping-pong sized balls, each color having a different weight and point value, and dropping them in the goals. The tower on the arena is filled with ping-pong balls and has a hole on its base so that a team can score a significant number of points when the tower is pushed over their goal.

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My team, Holy Moly!, designed a vehicle based on the game’s rules that would be capable of pushing the ball tower and collecting balls on the flat surface of the arena. After coming up with the initial design, we used SolidWorks to create a finalized design and figure out our manufacturing plans. Next, we used our class knowledge to select motors and fasteners, make sure our machine was stable, and assemble our machine. Our machine was built from aluminum, plastic and steel using the following manufacturing machines: lathe, mill, band sawing, laser cutter, drill press, metal shear, metal bending brake, and arbor press.

We won 3rd place out of 40 teams and a cash prize of $200 at the Balltower Competition. Our vehicle was also selected to be used as an example for future Design and Manufacturing I classes. Below is a video of our vehicle during the testing phase.

For more info on Holy Moly!’s progression, see our team blog at http://balltower3-holymoly.blogspot.com

Design and Manufacturing I Balltower Game Machine

For my Design and Manufacturing I class, each team designed and built a vehicle to compete in the Balltower Game. The goal of the game is get the highest score by collecting ping-pong sized balls, each color having a different weight and point value, and dropping them in the goals. The tower on the arena is filled with ping-pong balls and has a hole on its base so that a team can score a significant number of points when the tower is pushed over their goal.

image
My team, Holy Moly!, designed a vehicle based on the game’s rules that would be capable of pushing the ball tower and collecting balls on the flat surface of the arena. After coming up with the initial design, we used SolidWorks to create a finalized design and figure out our manufacturing plans. Next, we used our class knowledge to select motors and fasteners, make sure our machine was stable, and assemble our machine. Our machine was built from aluminum, plastic and steel using the following manufacturing machines: lathe, mill, band sawing, laser cutter, drill press, metal shear, metal bending brake, and arbor press.

We won 3rd place out of 40 teams and a cash prize of $200 at the Balltower Competition. Our vehicle was also selected to be used as an example for future Design and Manufacturing I classes. Below is a video of our vehicle during the testing phase.

For more info on Holy Moly!’s progression, see our team blog at http://balltower3-holymoly.blogspot.com

Tools, Materials, and Processes I: Construction

TMP I: Construction is an introductory art class with a focus on 3-D constructive processes. Before this class, I did not have much previous experience working with fibers, ceramics, metals, woods, and plastics. On average, I spent 12-16 hours a week outside of class on these projects. 


Fibers

Prompt: Create a functional piece that can be worn on the head and/or shoulders.

Tools/Skills: sewing machine, scissors, hand sewing, sewing techniques

Project statement: This wearable sculpture protects the user by warding people off with its spiky appearance. The sturdy paper design on the front acts as a piece of armor, covering all of the vital organs. The ruffles and the pillow inside of the sculpture add to the comfort while the inner pockets hide personal belongings from potential thieves. The contrast between the inside and the outside of the sculpture shows that looks can be deceiving. The wearer can slumber in peace without any invasions of personal space.

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Ceramics

Prompt: Create a sculptural stand and vessel (cup) and use life-casting/mold making techniques to naturally reference the body.

Tools/Skills: mold-making, slip casting

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Metals

Prompt: Create a piece using copper and steel.

Tools/Skills: Jewelry saw, metal grinder, metal nibbler, metal brake, metal bender, drill press, sheet metal roller, hammer, copper patinas, welding, annealing 

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Woods

Prompt: Create a piece with an additive and a subtractive component that is a reaction to the body.

Tools/Skills: band saw, sanding machines, radial arm saw, drill press, hand drill, dremel, chiseling techniques

(image coming soon)


Plastics

Prompt: Create a lamp.

Tools/Skills: plastic cutter, scroll saw, heat gun, rivet gun, Weld-On 4

My lamp contrasts the natural form of deer antlers with the artificial quality of the plastic.

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#art  

Selections from Intro to Drawing

Selections from Intro to Drawing

#art  

The Solar Sun-Catcher

The Solar Sun-Catcher was a project for Intro to Engineering: Photovoltaics and Solar Powered Systems

Abstract from the Final Report

As solar energy continues to develop, its growth has been hindered by the unattractive appearance of solar panels, especially in residential areas. The Random Co. Solar Sun-Catcher aims to bridge the gap between appearance and functionality, thereby improving perceptions of solar technology. The prototype incorporates solar panels mounted onto a 11.2 x 11.4 inch transparent blue acrylic block “M” design, which is connected to a battery/charger box. The device has an efficiency of 11%, and is capable of outputting a power of 1.823 W with a voltage of 4.5 V and a current of 4.5 mA. It is also capable of charging an iPod Touch in approximately 4 hours. The cost of materials for the prototype was 98 dollars, which will be lowered once improvements on our product are made. The use of our design will increase interest in solar power through its attractive design. As a result our product will promote the use of sustainable energy.

The Solar Sun-Catcher

The Solar Sun-Catcher was a project for Intro to Engineering: Photovoltaics and Solar Powered Systems

Abstract from the Final Report

As solar energy continues to develop, its growth has been hindered by the unattractive appearance of solar panels, especially in residential areas. The Random Co. Solar Sun-Catcher aims to bridge the gap between appearance and functionality, thereby improving perceptions of solar technology. The prototype incorporates solar panels mounted onto a 11.2 x 11.4 inch transparent blue acrylic block “M” design, which is connected to a battery/charger box. The device has an efficiency of 11%, and is capable of outputting a power of 1.823 W with a voltage of 4.5 V and a current of 4.5 mA. It is also capable of charging an iPod Touch in approximately 4 hours. The cost of materials for the prototype was 98 dollars, which will be lowered once improvements on our product are made. The use of our design will increase interest in solar power through its attractive design. As a result our product will promote the use of sustainable energy.

Sound & Structure for 42 Hours of Re_Creativity

Sound & Structure is the creation of Team Swagg for 42 Hours of Re_Creativity, a interdisciplinary design competition. Team Swagg was the only all-freshman team and consisted of students from the music, art & design, and engineering disciplines. For the competition, our team could spend no more than 50 dollars and could only use reused and repurposed materials to create something new in only 42 hours. Sound & Structure was built to create a community space where people of any musical ability could connect, have fun, and make their own music. The final piece consisted of a reclaimed wood cube structure, two sets of pitched PVC pipes an octave apart, and two sets of pitched wine bottles. Paddles made from old shoes and ping-pong paddles were used to hit the PVC pipes, and sticks were used to strike the wine bottles. The set up of the piece allows players to face each other and interact while they play with the sculpture. Our team was successful in achieving our goal since passersby were very intrigued by the piece and constantly walked up to play the “instruments” together. 

More info: http://artsengine.umich.edu/42hrs.php

Sound & Structure for 42 Hours of Re_Creativity

Sound & Structure is the creation of Team Swagg for 42 Hours of Re_Creativity, a interdisciplinary design competition. Team Swagg was the only all-freshman team and consisted of students from the music, art & design, and engineering disciplines. For the competition, our team could spend no more than 50 dollars and could only use reused and repurposed materials to create something new in only 42 hours. Sound & Structure was built to create a community space where people of any musical ability could connect, have fun, and make their own music. The final piece consisted of a reclaimed wood cube structure, two sets of pitched PVC pipes an octave apart, and two sets of pitched wine bottles. Paddles made from old shoes and ping-pong paddles were used to hit the PVC pipes, and sticks were used to strike the wine bottles. The set up of the piece allows players to face each other and interact while they play with the sculpture. Our team was successful in achieving our goal since passersby were very intrigued by the piece and constantly walked up to play the “instruments” together. 

More info: http://artsengine.umich.edu/42hrs.php